• Going with the flow.

    AND flow it did – so much so, the start of the new Golf Premier League season has been postponed for another week.

    The only competition players appeared on Saturday for a par round, won by resident web foot Sue Parsons with minus four.

    A group of four turned up on Wednesday, named themselves the ‘King Gee Girls’ (any tougher and they’d rust) and played their own competition.

    Winner was Sam Bailey from Sue Parsons, Lesley Anderson and Nikki Coffey.

    Madness hardly covers it.

    Most of us have lost hope that the rain will eventually stop – so here are some tips for playing on a wet golf course.

    Most players will find they chunk or blade a shot when playing on a wet course.

    When you are playing under normal, dry conditions, the bounce of your club adds an element of forgiveness.

    Under soft conditions, your club is more prone to dig into the ground, thus creating the ‘fat’ shot – or you get so wrapped up in avoiding the ‘fat’ chunk, you end up blading the ball and watch it scream over the green into who knows what.

    Neither are very fun or helpful to your score.

    To avoid this, you need to hit the ball first – but not hit the ball only.

    When you address the ball on wet turf your feet will sink into the ground, just like they do when you swing from the sand.

    To offset the fact that your swing arc has been lowered, make sure to grip down on the club a full inch.

    Stand taller to the ball (don’t bend as much from your hips) so that you can comfortably hover the club above the ground and line up the leading edge with the ball’s equator.

    Aim for a spot one inch in front of the ball.

    Your goal is to hit the back of the ball and then drive your club into the ground at that spot.

    This gives you ball-first contact and negates any interference from the wet turf.

    Your club can and should contact the ground – only it will be after you’ve hit the ball.

    Remember, you can take relief without penalty from casual water (outside a hazard), but the water must be visible before or after you take your stance.

    By Wendy Hunt